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It's My Energy, I'll Save if I Want to

It's My Energy, I'll Save if I Want to

We're finally recovering from another Oklahoma summer that soared into triple digits. Several days of breaking record temperatures near 110 degrees and a lack of rain forced Governor Mary Fallin to order a statewide burn ban that remains in effect. At one point, the state's larger cities mandated water rationing and even utilities were asking custo...

We're finally recovering from another Oklahoma summer that soared into triple digits. Several days of breaking record temperatures near 110 degrees and a lack of rain forced Governor Mary Fallin to order a statewide burn ban that remains in effect. At one point, the state's larger cities mandated water rationing and even utilities were asking customers to conserve electricity. OG&E said power demand neared a record during the first week of August. Summer usage typically spikes on hot days in the afternoon from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. The high demand lead OG&E to ask customers to conserve energy where they can, by shutting off lights when they aren’t in use, turning up thermostats a couple of degrees and shutting off appliances that aren’t being used. Unfortunately, a new survey out shows many Americans don’t believed those steps actually help save any energy. The poll, conducted by the Center for Public Affairs Research, shows 8 in 10 say they easily can turn off the lights when they leave a room, and 6 in 10 have no problem turning up the thermostat in summer. However, fewer than half think those easy steps save large amounts of energy. Nearly two-thirds believe individuals alone can’t make much of a difference and, instead, look to large institutions for leadership in saving energy. For other easy ways to save energy around your house during the summer, visit the Conservation page at oerb.com.